Sunday, October 19, 2014

Connected Learners #ce14 #clmooc

Connections.  Everywhere. A network of sharing and growing.
That's what being a connected learner is.  My connection with #clmooc has expanded my focus from one classroom and one teacher, to a networked community from which I can give just as much as I can learn.

Here's a network, a small one:
Note: You can enlarge the MindMap and click the related links.


Create your own mind maps at MindMeister


I've made several connections by following blogs of people I admire and learn from on Twitter and in other communities. Here you see and can link to the Two Writing Teachers and Grant Wiggins. Their blogs brought me information about projects, workshops, rubrics, and checklists. I had already read about and started using the question strategies noted in the Right Question book, but Grant Wiggins brought it new dimension.

I designed a project based on a focus question:

"Thousands of kids from Central America are entering the United States illegally -- and alone."

Students wrote and considered open and closed questions before reading an article about it. Then they answered their top three questions.

By this time I had read the blogs and Grant's book, so I designed an authentic task that would include several Common Core State Standards as students collaborated, investigated, discovered relevant content, designed a campaign, and edited each presentation:

"With a team of peers, collaborate to create an informational or persuasive campaign for an audience of your choice to share the information you research about "Thousands of kids from Central America are entering the United States illegally -- and alone." Each team member will create a project for your campaign that meets the expectations of an investigative researcher and project designer. Together, your artifacts will present a thorough, factual, and detailed explanation, and perhaps solution, of the topic. "
Along with the task, considering the Common Core State Standards,  I drafted a set of Essential Questions which we will consider all year:

Essential Questions:
  • Investigate: How do researchers investigate successfully?
  • Collaborate: What strategies and processes do collaborators need for success?
  • Discover and Develop Content: How do readers and writers determine and develop relevant, accurate, and complete topics?
  • Design and Organize Presentation: How do publishers design and organize content for their audience and purpose?
  • Edit Language: Why and how do editors and speakers use and edit with the rules for standard English grammar and language?
I had already drafted a rubric, and now revised it to include the Standards and the five topics of the Essential Questions. Finally, I created draft checklists that explain the rubric and allow students and I to connect and confer on the progress and growth of their work. We now have authentic work: Kids Alone.

Student chose their focus, audience, and purpose and began their investigations, collaborating in teams. I confer with each team as we discuss the checklists and transfer our progress to see how we meet the expectations on  the rubric.

Here are the project documents:



As we work on our campaigns, students are connecting with each other and with me. I provide feedback towards learning goals and standards, and peers teach peers as well. Here is one example from a team of four students: Debate: Are You For or Against Obama?  There audience is bloggers, and their purpose is to consider both sides of an issue.

So, through my connections in blogs, on Twitter, and through blogger's books, I have developed a learning progression that differentiates student learning, expects high standards of work, and provides a venue for students to connect and collaborate as well. Since many have chosen to publish work online, their connections could grow globally.

We are all connected learners.

Please remember this is a school-related site. Model digital citizenship. Thank you.

Monday, October 13, 2014

Twitter Sunday #ccss #ce14

What did I learn on Sunday [Monday] Twitter?


I focused on Common Core State Standards.


ASCD presents several resources in a Pinterest Board you can follow:



A WA State teacher shares her #CCSS resources for parents; you may find them useful as well.



And Stanford has free online classes, including for #CCSS
And a teacher recognizes that students need to part of the #CCSS equation -- participants in the process:

I stumbled upon and old tweet about authentic learning, so relevant to #CCSS college and career ready:

Which led me to this one from Buck Institute -- how that authentic learning leads to success on the new #CCSS assessments:

So --- I've got some ideas to play around with.  How about you?

Please remember this is a school-related site. Model digital citizenship. Thank you.

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Google Drive and more from Susan Oxnevad #ce14

Power Up Pedagogy presented Susan Oxnevad's ThingLink experise.

On her site I found this terrific -- amazing -- professional development slideshow of tips and strategies and how tos:

ThingLink on Google Drive
ThingLink on Differentiation
ThingLink on SAMR -- tech integration
Webinars -- 2014 Schedule


Being connected provides a world of resources at my fingertips -- and those finds I share with others so they may learn and grow as well.

Thanks what being a connected educator --- a connected learner --- is all about.

Enjoy and learn:




Link to slideshow

Please remember this is a school-related site. Model digital citizenship. Thank you.

Sunday, October 5, 2014

#ce14 Twitter PLN Shares

What did I learn from my Personal Learning Network [PLN] on Twitter this week?



1) Email Etiquette from Vicki Davis

How should we respond to all those emails and requests? How do we help parents and guardians? Good advice here from Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher:


2)  Reading, Writing Twitter -- or Twitter-on-paper, and Bloom's Taxonomy


Since students don't have Twitter accounts, read the Twitter stream and ask them a "Twitter" assessment question using 140 characters.

3) Why use Twitter?  a retweet by Michelle Lewis links to this Seattle Pacific University PD in 2 Minutes:


4) Homework?  What is the research? Thanks Assistant Principal Dan McCabe:
5)  Google Tools Videos in One Place from Richard Byrne

 Image Source:

By Peeragogia (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The image is an excellent overview of HOW to develop your PLN.



Please remember this is a school-related site. Model digital citizenship. Thank you.

Friday, October 3, 2014

#ce14 Connected Learners





It's Day 3 of Connected Educator Month. I've been promoting CE14 at school.  So, I thought I'd take the time to download the starter kit for Connected Educator Month at the site http://connectededucators.org/  and get started, sharing a little of my own journey.

Maybe you haven't downloaded it yet -- so here's a few important ideas to help explain this important event.

What is Connected Educator Month?

From the handbook:

Millions of educators and others around the world have participated in hundreds of professional development opportunities as part of Connected Edu- cator Month (CEM) the past two years. Originally developed by the U.S. Department of Education and its partners as part of the Connected Educators initiative, CEM offers highly distributed, diverse, and engaging activities to educators at all levels.
Why Connected Educator Month?

Millions of educators are connected to learning communities and networks to obtain [and give] "just in time" connections to information and collaboration to empower teachers and students in their own agency. However, many educators still do not understand the learning power of connected networking -- and most districts don't honor the professional learning occurring in these interest-driven, personal choices to access a network of resources that inform instruction and pedagogy.

Since 2007, I have participated in online courses, webinars, events, conferences, and collaborations that directly affected the teaching and learning in my classroom so that my instruction prepares students for their futures, which are far different than my past, and my prior educational experiences.  I became a connected learner.

As the handbook states:

You know that the world is changing...

New and emerging Web technologies are connecting our children in ways never before possible. Through blogs, social networking sites, multimedia and other Web 2.0 tools, their world is becoming more and more net- worked and participatory. Your students spend time every day in virtual environments that are highly engaging and encourage creative thinking and problem solving. They frequently participate in games and social me- dia where they routinely acquire and apply knowledge and collaborate with friends.

...but schools are not.
I accepted the challenge these changes expect of both my professional and personal learning practice.

From the handbook:

If you want to become a 21st century connected educator — and prepare iGeneration students for an exciting but unpredictable future — you first have to become a 21st century learner. That’s right. The “connected learner” is YOU. To become a connected educator, you must first become a connected learner.
Connected Educator Month helps you become a connected learner, learning in small steps some of the strategies, tools, and pedagogy that our students expect from us. A connected learner connects with others online, collaborating through social media and other venues such as Google Apps to discuss and practice this 21st Century shift to personalized, just-in-time learning, bringing the ideas back to the classroom and the school.

Connected Learners open up their doors and let the world in -- learning together what works and what doesn't. The conversation turns towards collaborative practice -- asking critical questions and listening to perspectives as they add to their personal and professional network with global connections and conversations.  Will Richardson explains it better: Click here.  Whether a classroom has one computer, one iPad or tablet or smartphone, or more, a classroom with a connected educator can connect easily with other classrooms.  Read about it here.

In 2007, I began my journey with Steve Hargadon who started Learning Central and Classroom Live.  Classroom Live is still going strong -- a Saturday 9:00 am adventure in educational technology. One hour of amazing learning. Saturday, October 4th is Michael Fricano's Research with Google Drive. I'll be watching the archives of that one. Check out the archives -- find one you're interested in -- any time of the day.  That's the beauty of online education -- just in time, and 24/7. It fits your schedule!

My professional/personal learning network comprises some amazing educators, principals, superintendents, authors, and middle school teachers just like me. I've had the honor of vlogging with Ben Wilkoff, Director of Personalized Professional Learning at Denver Public Schools, and Susan Spellman-Cann, counselor and psychologist in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, and others in our Fellowship of the Open Spokes. I've collaborated on a connected learner beginner's presentation for CEM 2012 using Twitter and Google Apps with Denise Krebs and Karen Fasimpaur. And so much more -- because I chose to take a small step forward in 2007. I chose the path of a connected learner, whose pedagogy you can read about here in the MacArthur Foundation supported Digital Media and Learning Research Hub, where connected learning is researched and shared. Again, a connected educator starts as a connected learner -- and we all know learning is not easy, but as one of my students quoted me this year, "Learning is hard fun." It also helps me understand the learners in my classroom because I am always learning.



So. Are you ready?  Do you accept the challenge? One small step ?????

Day 1:  Learn "What is a connected educator?" 

If you've read the above info -- you've taken the first step.  The handbook also links to these books and these books and these books.

How about:
Gee, James Paul
Next, the handbook asks you to create a Google account -- but wait!  You already have one!  In a new document,  take your notes from the above wiki information to answer the question:


What might Web 2.0 mean for learning and why should I care?

Here's mine:  Web 2.0 CE14 SRE  

Your turn!


Day 3:Twitter

Yes: Twitter -- microblogging in 140 characters.   Learn about it here: Twitter in Plain English.

 How to Twitter by Sue Waters of Edublogs

Create a personal account, then download the the starter kit  Connected Educator Month handbook for Day 3 to earn a badge!
 I follow Steve, Sue, Shell, John, and Sheryl already and so should you.

Now you've started your journey as a connected learner -- and a connected educator.

Come on!  You can do it!  Join the unofficial Google Plus CEM community hosted by Sheryl here

This is where I started after signing up for Twitter to follow my granddaughter and discovered all the educational resources and connections -- my first tweet:



It's your turn!  Take that first step...  then return here to comment on -- share -- your experience as a connected learner.

Please remember this is a school-related site. Model digital citizenship. Thank you.

#ce14 5 Ideas to Connect

 

Connected Educator Month: 5 Ideas to Connect:


1 Check out the starter kit for Connected Educator Month:

http://connectededucators.org/
2 Or read what a Connected Educator is by Tom Whitby

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/connected-educator-begins-with-collaboration-tom-whitby

3 Or take the Edublogs "Build Your PLN Teacher Challenge"
[I'll help you set up your blog!]

http://teacherchallenge.edublogs.org/creating-a-pln/

4 Or just find an event of interest to you and participate.
Arme Duncan would be proud of you!

http://connectededucators.org/calendar/

5 Or just read your colleague's Digital.Is National Writing Project post on Student Collaborative Practice [Sheri Edwards] :

http://digitalis.nwp.org/site-blog/building-student-collaborative-practice-ce14/6192

Take a small step and begin your journey as a connected, life-long learner -- a connected educator.


"Millions of educators and others around the world have participated in hundreds of professional development opportunities as part of Connected Educator Month (CEM) the past two years. Originally developed by the U.S. Department of Education and its partners as part of the Connected Educators initiative, CEM offers highly distributed, diverse, and engaging activities to educators at all levels. Based on its success in 2012 and 2013, the initiative is poised to reach even more educators in 2014, through expanded partnerships and enhanced programming."

Please remember this is a school-related site. Model digital citizenship. Thank you.